Our English Classes

A blog for Maribel's students at EOI and CEP Granada

Archive for the ‘10. outside of a dog’ Category

AV1 Books for the class

Posted by maribel on 10/10/2013

These are the text books we are going to use in class:

     

And this is the book we are going to read in the first  term of the course:

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C1 Books for the class

Posted by maribel on 10/10/2013

This is the text book we are going to use in class:

And these are the books we are going to read in the first and second term of the course:

         

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AV1 Reading Second Term

Posted by maribel on 23/01/2013

You have to choose one of these books. Click on the image to find out more about them.

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Dickens Bicentennary at Parque de las Ciencias

Posted by maribel on 17/12/2012

Sophia and Paula read to celebrate Dickens Bicentennary:

A TALE OF TWO CITIES

A STORY OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION

By Charles Dickens

It was the best of times,
it was the worst of times,
it was the age of wisdom,
it was the age of foolishness,
it was the epoch of belief,
it was the epoch of incredulity,
it was the season of Light,
it was the season of Darkness,
it was the spring of hope,
it was the winter of despair,

we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way— in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever.

It was the year of Our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five. Spiritual revelations were conceded to England at that favoured period, as at this. Mrs. Southcott had recently attained her five-and-twentieth blessed birthday, of whom a prophetic private in the Life Guards had heralded the sublime appearance by announcing that arrangements were made for the swallowing up of London and Westminster.

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The God of Small Things

Posted by maribel on 05/01/2011


The God of Small Things (1997) is a novel by Indian author Arundhati Roy. It is a story about the childhood experiences of twin siblings Rahel and Estha. All members in their large, diverse, unique, and typical family play a role in shaping the world of the twins, for better and for worse. Each family member’s life is affected by politics, history, and culture clash, and while each person takes a different path through it all, each of their choices influences the family at large. The essential story is one of love but one in which the players become victims of gender,  caste and race divides, but, in the words of Roy, “even though you know that what happened was tragic, the fact that it happened was wonderful.” Roy uses non-linear narrative and a unique language. The humor in the way the point of view of the children is presented gives you a relief from the tragic story.

“To say that it all began when Sophie Mol came to Ayemenem is only one way of looking at it. Equally it could be argued that it actually began thousands of years ago long before the Marxists came, before the British took Malabar, before the Dutch Ascendancy, before da Gama arrived, before the ‘s conquest of Calicut. It could be argued that it began long before Christianity arrived in a boat and seeped into Kerala like tea from a tea bag. But it really began in the days when the Love Laws were made. The laws that lay down who should be loved, and how. And how much.”

Listen, watch and read about this book in the excellent Invitation to World Literature site.

This is a Nerina Pallot‘s song of the same title:

God of all things, God of small things, God of power and might,
Did you really make the world in seven days and seven nights?
‘Cause I don’t know if you exist or if I even care,
But when I lay me down to sleep I’d like somebody there. 

‘Cause it’s hard to make sense of this all, and it gets harder with each passing day.
I believe in little things, and things I cannot see;
In science and the saints and all that stuff like gravity,
Not that sentimental fairytale to keep us in our place.
‘Cause I have seen you here when no-one else is looking –
A calm and silent bliss, a calm and silent bliss.

All your people do these days is argue, fuss and fight,
Then they fuss some more and wipe the blood and say, “At least we know we’re right”.
How foolishly, how foolishly your good things come undone,
How silently, how silently, and now we all are done.

And it’s hard to make sense of it all, and it gets harder with each passing day.
But I believe in little things, and things I cannot see;
In science and the saints and all that stuff like gravity,
Not some sentimental fairytale to keep us in our place.
‘Cause I have seen you here when no-one else is watching –
A strange and silent bliss, a strange and silent bliss.

God of all things, God of small things, God of loss and hope,
God of people struggling, of people who can’t cope,
Do you keep your blessings for the rich, the pious and their guns?
Or if you’re half the man, I hope you root for everyone,
You root for everyone.

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The Curious Incident… /1

Posted by maribel on 31/12/2010

Mark Haddon‘s latest book for children, Boom! has just been translated into Spanish. Read a short interview with the author published today in El País here.

And here you have  quite informal video review of the book:

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The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time

Posted by maribel on 11/11/2010

“Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend: and inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read” said Groucho Marx .

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time is a novel written by Mark Haddon which won the 2003 Whitbread Book of the Year . Its title is a quotation of a remark made by the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes in a short story by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.
This bitterly funny debut novel is a murder mystery of sorts -one told by an autistic version of Adrian Mole. Fifteen-year-old Christopher John Francis Boone is mathematically gifted and socially hopeless, raised in a working-class home by parents who can barely cope with their child’s quirks. He takes everything that he sees (or is told) at face value, and is unable to sort out the strange behavior of his elders and peers.

Late one night, Christopher comes across his neighbour’s poodle, Wellington, impaled on a garden fork. Wellington’s owner finds him cradling her dead dog in his arms, and has him arrested. After spending a night in jail, Christopher resolves -against the objection of his father and neighbours- to discover just who has murdered Wellington. He is encouraged by Siobhan, a social worker at his school, to write a book about his investigations, and the result- quirkily illustrated, with each chapter given its own prime number- is The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.

Groucho also said: “I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book.”

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